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Forms & Sample Documents: General

General Forms Databases:

  • Nationwide in scope
  • Most draw from common-law concepts
  • May point to some state or federal-specific language
  • Serve as templates
  • Should be cross-checked against jurisdiction’s court rules, especially for litigation forms such as motions or complaints to ensure that formatting and language confirm to the court’s specifications. 

Bloomberg Law

Most form resources on Bloomberg Law are topic or jurisdiction specific.
There are several links that act as gateways to these resources which you may want to try:

Click on Transactional Intelligence Center, then on Search Precedent Database under Drafting Tools and then browse by Document Type or Transaction Type.

  • ALI-ABA Forms Library (broken into topic-specific databases)
  • Bloomberg BNA Sample Forms—takes you to list of forms organized by topic
  • Clause Database
  • Document Database—search by document type and key word
  • PLI Forms & Agreements—takes you to list of available forms

Practical Law

Search for Forms using the Resource Types tab, following the instructions given on the Overview page.

Lexis Advance

Click on Browse Sources and then select “Forms” at Content Type, then “Non-jurisdictional” as your jurisdiction. Add search terms in the “search sources” box to further narrow your search.

Some highlights:

  • Warren’s Forms of Agreements—covers corporate forms, securities and real property along with a variety of other subjects. Less full page forms and more individual clauses are included in this resource.
  • Douglas’s Forms—both transactional and litigation-focused forms for a multitude of practice areas

Westlaw

Under “Forms” link on the main Browse page:

  • American Jurisprudence Legal Forms—organized alphabetically like an encyclopedia, review the “summary” link at the beginning of each topic for a description of the scope of that topic and a list of subtopics that are “treated elsewhere.” The summary also provides links to secondary sources and other related form books (also in print)
  • American Jurisprudence Pleading & Practice Forms Annotated—also organized alphabetically or see the index link on the right side of the database screen. Focus is on litigation more than transactional forms. Provides the same “summary” information as the legal forms database. (also in print)
  • Basic Legal Transactions—organized into 4 categories: Real Estate Transactions, Business Transactions, Family Transactions and Attorney-Client Fee Agreement. Offers more of a description of what to include in a particular type of document rather than providing a sample form to copy and paste
  • Lane’s Goldstein Litigation Forms—not jurisdiction-specific, includes client interview checklists and other general case management forms as well as some sample motions and filings.
  • Nichols Cyclopedia of Legal Forms Annotated—organized alphabetically, gives a summary similar to that found in American Jurisprudence Legal Forms including the scope and references to other related sections and secondary sources
  • West’s Legal Forms—organized by subtopics such as “employment,” “real estate transactions-commercial” and “specialized forms” that is a catch-all category organized by subtopic.

Other Westlaw Databases:

  • Sample Agreements—on main Browse page, organized by topic or search across the entire database using the “All Agreements” link; documents drafted by actual law firms and in-house counsel. Can search by key term or by such fields as “clause title,” “governing law,” “jurisdiction” and party or law firm name.
  • Secondary Sources Index—Alphabetical list of all secondary sources on Westlaw many of which contain forms